Bryce Canyon

By June 18, 2015 blog, Hiking, landscapes, Photography, Travel, USA
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After Page, AZ I headed to Bryce Canyon in Utah. A short and beautiful drive weaving around the state line between AZ and UT. I finally arrived at Bryce Canyon National Park. I luckily got one of the last available first come- first served camping spots in the North Campground. A campground situated directly behind some of the most spectacular spots the canyon has to offer.

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These first sets of photos were taken as the sun rose my second morning. There was a hush over everything, even the people who were out taking photos were talking only in hushed voices. The colors in the early morning sun are gorgeous, with the sun rising directly across from the canyon. Hues of orange, pink, red, and white with pops of dusty green sparkle across the towering, carved spires or Hoodoos.

 

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This is from the viewpoint looking over Fairytale point.

 

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These next set of photos were from a hike I took the first day with some new friends at the time. I was lucky enough to camp beside a group of young people, around my age, from Michigan. They invited me to join them on several hikes while we were in the park. The first afternoon we hiked the Navajo loop, which ends in what is called “Wall Street.” A nice couple mile loop this hike was the perfect first day hike.

I was astounded at how large the Hoodoos are, towering overing the trail in their unique shapes. Formed by two types of water erosion these spires look like a drip castle. Water will runoff, down the 2000ft of the canyon weaving through the soft limestone, creating soft curves in the towers. It also creates cracks by weaving into the rock and then freezing, bursting apart the soft rock. Eroding at a fairly fast rate, Bryce Canyon will have a full foot cut away in about 50 years. The different colors in the rock are from different time periods, differing levels of certain minerals, mainly iron, giving different hues.

 

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While we were there it was a beautiful full moon. The moon was so bright that the landscape was lit at night, complete with shadows. Unfortunately this did shadow the normal dark, starry skies that Bryce is famous for. Here you can see the moon rising above the canyon, a big beautiful mystical giant.

 

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The second day we went on a hike around the eight mile Fairyland Loop trail. The trail wound in and around the canyon, up and down the Hoodoos. The trail offered many vastly different viewpoints and made you feel quite small among the spires. A strenuous hike the Fairyland loop offers an intimate view of the fascinating landscape that is Bryce Canyon. I opted to leave my camera at home, to try and soak up the moment.

 

Bryce Canyon was one of the most unique landscapes that I have seen and one of my favorite parts of Utah. Knowing that it will change consistently with erosion makes it definitely worth seeing soon.

The next day I headed to Zion National Park, a short 2.5 hour drive from Bryce.

 

xo,

Josie

 

 

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